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Infamous NASCAR Trickster L.W. Wright Dies

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Clear Facts

  • L. W. Wright, known for tricking his way into racing the 1982 Winston 500, has passed away at the age of 76.
  • He died on Jan. 26 in Nashville, Tennessee at the Lois M. DeBerry Special Needs Facility, where he had been in prison since Feb. 2023 on multiple charges.
  • Wright managed to deceive several people, including the legendary Sterling Marlin, to get both money and a car, and found himself in the Winston Cup.

L. W. Wright, the man who managed to trick his way into racing the 1982 Winston 500, has sadly passed away at the age of 76. He died on Jan. 26, with the news of his death being shared in a Jan. 28 article from The Scene Vault Podcast.

Wright passed away in Nashville, Tennessee at the Lois M. DeBerry Special Needs Facility around midnight. He had been in prison since he was arrested on multiple charges — theft over $2,500, burglary, worthless checks, and evading arrest — in Feb. 2023.

For those unfamiliar with Wright’s story, he entered the 1982 race at Talladega. Despite ‘Dega being one of the big races and the lights being bright, nobody knew who this guy was — even though he claimed to have raced in more than 40 NASCAR races.

In a remarkable turn of events, Wright managed to trick several people, including the legendary Sterling Marlin, to get both money and a car. As a result, he found himself in the Winston Cup.

In 2022, 40 years after the infamous race, Wright eventually gave his side of the story. At the age of 73, he spoke to Rick Houston at a secret location for The Scene Vault podcast. A clip of the conversation was provided to ESPN by Houston.

Wright’s incredible feat has earned him a place in NASCAR history as a massive legend. Rest in peace, L. W. Wright.

Clear Thoughts (op-ed)

The passing of L.W. Wright, the man who infamously tricked his way into the 1982 Winston 500, is a reminder of a time when the world of NASCAR was less regulated and more open to the daring feats of individuals. Wright’s audacious entry into the race, despite having no previous experience, is a testament to his determination and resourcefulness.

Although his actions were deceptive and ultimately led him to a life of crime and incarceration, it’s hard not to admire the sheer nerve it took to pull off such a stunt. Wright’s story is a cautionary tale, but it also highlights the importance of perseverance and thinking outside the box.

L.W. Wright’s legend will live on in NASCAR history, serving as a reminder of the colorful characters that once graced the sport. As we remember him, let us also reflect on the importance of taking risks and pushing boundaries, even if it means facing the consequences. Rest in peace, L.W. Wright.

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. PatrioTEA

    February 2, 2024 at 9:44 am

    Sorry, no sympathy here for that criminal.

  2. Colleen

    February 3, 2024 at 10:37 am

    What about Bubba Wallace. Best hoax of al. He alone has destroyed what NASCAR was always meant to be.

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